Category Archives: long-range planning

Farm My Yard Design Contest in full swing!

I’m having fun with a sign design contest. Check it out @ http://farmmyyard.org/yard-sign-design-contest/
Here’s Kate posing with my first sign this weekend. This is going to be good!

Advertisements

Pulling Together

In my work as a networker, social networker, email marketing, Facebook teaching, activist, kibbutznik, I tend to think big picture much of the time. At one of my recent Facebook classes, one of the participants, Robert, pulled me aside and asked “why aren’t we Portlanders pulling together more of the time?”  He had lived in San Diego and watched as the new age movement prospered there as many of the participants would support each other by buying one anothers’ books, attending each others’ seminars and basically boostering for one another – the helping all boats to rise theory in action.  And, it worked.

I agree with Robert and have often thought that our community could use a directory of services, a bank/fund for helping members through tough times as well as something that might be available for scholarships for dance workshops or similar purposes.  Since I think that ecstatic dancing is the cat’s meow, and one of the best methods for staying healthy and smart and is also a great community creation tool (like), I’ve also been interested in seeing it spread far and wide. To that end, I wrote this piece last year, and also turned it into a cute cartoon.

Since then a few folks from Portland have gone and started ecstatic dance in their new communities – Erik Blender in Orcas Island and Cheri Anderson in Surprise Valley near Phoenix are the two that I’m most familiar with, and if there are more – please let me know about them.  If you know people who live near these areas, please send them Cheri/Erik’s way – as their success will both add to their financial well-being, but will also move more people in the direction of the goodness we have found.  Spreading good ideas = healing the planet.

In this vein, Eleanor O’Brien’s show, Dominatrix for Dummies, is a big shout out for ecstatic dance. Eleanor’s show is playing in Seattle 4 more times – we all know people who live in Seattle – help her show sell out and help your friends find their way to the dance floor (The Seattle ecstatic dance scene is building with new dances starting up at OmCulture and beyond.  They even have a clothing optional dance… Portlandia???)  Eleanor and her show are also about to take the show further afield to Santa Cruz, CA, Orlando, Edmonton (Canada), St. Lawrence, NY and elsewhere.  If you want to help spread the goodness of ecstatic dance and support one of our own, figure out how to track what Eleanor’s doing (her email list is a good start, get on it!) and send your friends and relatives to see her when she comes to their town. She’s probably also up for performing her show in towns that are on her road-trip route if you want to go the extra mile 🙂

Pulling Together for reals

What would our community look like if we were all pulling for each other a little bit more?  I’ve got a list of local healthcare providers who are mostly dancers that I share with the world. What would happen if we routed our buying decisions through a dance filter?  It’s certainly something to ponder. I welcome your comments and involvement.

Thanks for dancing
Thanks for continuing to show up
Thanks for continuing to DJ
Thanks for continuing to make alters
Thanks, Thanks, Thanks!

Albert, Caffe D’arte, April 18, 2012

Tree Planting Success 2012

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We had a great tree planting in Irvington, Sabin, Grant Park, and Alameda neighborhoods last weekend (March 10, 2012). thanks are in order! Here are some of the folks we want to thank!

  1. Friends of Trees Staff – esp. Jesse Batty and Erica Timm – for leading the charge and making the event go so smoothly.
  2. Eric McClelland and Marai Boamod – who drove the rental truck to Molalla and back and picked up our trees!
  3. To our fabulous local businesses who donated food and drink for the breakast and lunches: Whole Foods, Helen Bernhard Bakery, Costello’s Travel Caffe, Caffe D’arte, Peet’s Coffee on NE Broadway, Kettleman’s Bagels
  4. To the Holladay Park Church of God which has housed the event 2 years in a row. thank you!
  5. To our 150 volunteers who gather early on a Saturday morning and head out into the day and planted the trees – thanks for your labor and generous spirit!
  6. To neighbors who made food and donated food – the soups and chilis and stews were delicious, thank you!
  7. To Holli Talkington who photographed our day!
  8. The members of the band: Ten Spiders – we loved your music! Ten Spiders is available for hire – a great addition to just about any occation.
  9. To Alan Rahi and his partner Mira Eng-Goetz for designing and printing over 150 shirts for us! If you didn’t pick yours up it is probably waiting for you at the Friends of Trees office.
  10. To my fellow neighborhood coordinators: Lisa, Malcha, and Neil, who do a lot of behind the scenes work to make the planting go well – esp. including picking up the food donations and calling in utility locations.

I’m sure there are more people to thank, please feel free to add them into the comment section.  And, I’ll add more pictures here as they come in!  Thanks everyone for your help in adding to Portland’s canopy.

This year’s planting featured the volunteer effort of many young people.  I’ve never seen that many young people volunteering together before – it was impressive. Some day I hope that these young people will come back and visit the trees they planted and smile.

Lone Fir Community Garden

3.19.12 – I believe this is a good idea, and have put this effort on hold for the time being as I learn more on the issue. Feel free to ask how it’s going, to me, and Metro…

Yes, it’s time for a new face for the SW corner of the Lone Fir Cemetery, dontcha think?  Here’s a petition to that end. Please sign and encourage your friends to, thanks!

http://www.change.org/petitions/turn-the-sw-corner-of-the-lone-fir-cemetery-into-a-community-garden-please

Moregonian

From a FB conversation yesterday

I have an idea for an article for BlueOregon that I might write. It goes something like this. What if we (Portlanders/Oregonians) lived with a newspaper that had a more even keel to it, instead of reaching off into far right positions as the Oregonian often does. Instead, what if our paper had more of a positive, progressive take on things. Instead of seeing a forest and thinking board feet – once in a while the paper might give environmental/tourism/other species a chance. Instead of mirroring the views of business alliances and conservative religious views we might experience something less op-ed intensive, and more straight news. I wonder how our lives might be different. My guess is that there would be more readership, and perhaps more people would take leadership in the community as they’d have less fear of sticking their necks out and become part of an attack in the editorial pages of the local paper. I think it would probably also lead to more reasoned debate on the issues of the day. Thoughts?

…‎Jonathan: not sure I want to start a new paper. Just wondering “what if”. What if I lived in a town where the paper reflected the zeitgeist of the people who lived there. And it does happen. Eugene has a paper that is very “Eugene”. It’s actually incredible to read. Especially the letters section. Instead of keeping everyone in a constant state of suspense and printing and lot of bullshit, the paper seems to encourage creativity and action.

(Sarah mentioned the great small papers we have here ) I want the main paper to be that good, too. I could be. I was in Las Vegas recently. Their paper is even-keeled, and pleasant and interesting and topical and seems more useful than keeping everyone fighting all the time. There didn’t seem to be a vendetta like the O has with the Mayor, with environmentalists, with Occupy Portland, with some of the City Council members. the paper is a bully. The paper also supported Bush and Gordon Smith which were so unreflective of the people who live here that they just stood out as stupid, and awful. They continue to be that on a daily basis, thus making our City less friendly, less cooperative and more libertarian and crass.

I think we can have better and deserve better. It’s not going to just happen magically. It may be one more area we have to fight for in our lives.

GoDaddy no More, I’m switching my domains to Dreamhost

My good friend Bill recommended Dreamhost for domain hosting and I trust his recommendation. Plus, GoDaddy are sexist, for starters. Bye, jerks.

100 Year Weather Event, or the future of life in the Pacific Northwest?

My heart goes out to everyone in the Pacific Northwest who is being adversely affected by the current rains.

In the Pacific Northwest we’re used to heavy rain and all that it entails. But the recent rains have led to a level of flooding and hardship that people are calling a “100 Year Event”. I most recently heard people talking about this at Breitenbush where I spent new years and learned that two of the newly built bridges that span trails there had been washed out. Next up have been the January rains which have led to roads washing out, peoples’ houses being flooded and lots of landslides. Some towns like Vernonia, Oregon, seem to be having repeat flood events and the recent news is of thousands having to leave homes around the state, car accidents and lots of property damage.

My main question is “is this global climate change and its effects?” If so, are those who are calling this a “100 year event” actually missing the possibility that this may be how life here will continue to be from now on – rainy, with more and more rain and displacement.

I’ve long been following demographic trends around population growth and have been making the connection between our increased numbers and our effect on the environment. More pollution, species loss, rapid glacier melt, and running out of resources like oil have all been shown to be happening on an upward trend for years. What is less obvious is how all of this effects our world in places like Oregon, where we’re in a situation like the frog in the slowly heating water – we probably won’t change what we’re doing until the heat is turned way up, otherwise, the frog, in this scenario slowly boils and dies. Now, with the current rain, we have a warning sign that can’t be ignored.

Will we be smart and move towards actions that will slow global climate change or will we continue to adjust to its adverse effects and grin and bear it? Some smart moves that I think Oregonians could take that might increase our chances of experiencing a better future would be to plant trees and stop clear-cutting the ones we have. This would improve our (and the rest of the world’s) air quality, help control storm water and erosion problems and keep hillsides from sliding. I also think it would make sense for there to be some sort of program to move people out of floodplains and onto higher ground.

If there’s a chance that this year’s rains might repeat regularly what other moves should we as a society consider to avoid the high costs of the damage and to keep us all safe and dry? I’m sure there are hundreds. Should we be removing any extra pavement that exists as the group Depave works to do? Should we be planting millions of fruit and nut trees to make ourselves more food self-reliant and cut down on shipping costs of food? Are millions of new community and backyard gardens in our future? I’d love to see a state-wide or bioregion-wide analysis done of how we currently use our land and other resources and plug in possible weather events into the equation. I’m sure that would shed light on how prepared we will be for any future contingencies.

Will we learn from the current weather event? I suggest we treat it not like a “100 year event” but plan for the possibility that it may happen again next week, and next year. Let’s plan for the future not be run over by it.

————-

I posted this article on Daily Kos and there have been 100+ comments in one day. It’s a very interesting discussion of this topic. I highly recommend giving it a read – some very cool analysis, ideas, links and videos on the topic.